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Prominent or Poorly-Healed Scars

If you’ve been left with prominent scarring after trauma or surgery, it can be both embarrassing and distressing depending upon where the scar is situated. Prominent scars can occur for numerous reasons, though most commonly it’s because they did not heal properly.

Ensuring optimal scar healing is a key part of the planning process that Mr Paul Tulley undertakes as part of any surgical procedure and he will discuss you can best look after your incision area during the weeks and months after your procedure. However, there are always factors that can impact on your healing, from your body’s own individual response or wound infections.

It’s important to note that all scars are a bright red colour initially and they can take up to 18 months before they full heal, flattening and fading over time. Red haired, fair skinned and younger people also often find their scars are a brighter red than most. If your scar is still prominent after 18 months, however, there are revision treatments available.

What options do you have for the treatment of prominent scars? 

Usually all you need is conservative scar treatment to make the scar less prominent. This will usually involve massaging the scar with either a silicone cream or gel. Over time this helps to mature the scar, flattening and softening it.

If the prominent scar has occurred due to an unsatisfactory initial repair, or if the wound became infected, an excision may be a better treatment option. This involves removing the scar and re-suturing the skin. Once healed, the results should be less prominent.

There are a few other procedures available which might help including changing the direction of the scar. If the prominent scarring is quite complex or large, then numerous procedures may be carried out. This would include removing parts of the scar over a period of time. This treatment would be ongoing for several months.

The treatment offered to you will depend upon how prominent the scar is, as well as the possible causes.

Hypertrophic & Keloid Scars

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